Posts Tagged ‘2013 USA Boxing National Championships

07
Apr
13

2013 USA Boxing Nationals Final Results!

2013 USA Boxing Nationals Final Results! 

 

What a great night of boxing for the elite women in the competition! They fought tough, hard and strong with some returning champions and some newcomers getting the nod!

To my mind, it is hard to choose which fights delivered the most, though I have to say that 30 year old, Christina Cruz delivered with a capital D, executing a smart, savvy game plan, in her bout against Ayanna Vasquez, setting up Cruz’s next challenge, that historic 7th NY Daily News Golden Gloves title.

Olympian Queen Underwood’s four round non-stop battle against teammate and champion in her own right, Tiara Brown was nothing short of awesome. Both women fought their heart’s out trading hard shots, combinations and a yin-yang momentum that kept shifting. Still Underwood was able to pull out the close split-decision to claim the 132 lb. championship, but to my mind, both women came away women came away winners having put on a tremendous effort.

Olympian Marlen Esparza also won by split decision after four rounds of a surprising and spirited defense from Virginia Fuchs in the 112 lb. weight class. Fans really got into the fight and actually booed when the decision was called.

At 106 lbs, the two mighty-mights fighting for the championship, Elisha Halstead and Alejandra Mercado, set the tone for the night: two terrific boxers working everything they had in the ring. In the end Halstead got the nod with a split decision.

In the 125 lb. weight class, newcomer Jen Hamann gained momentum for four rounds to win the close split decision over Rianna Rios. Jen’s third round, where she threw tough, hard shots and a lot of body/head combinations turned the tide for her, and by the fourth round she knocked Rios around enough to get her a standing eight.

The veteran Bertha Aracil, who fought with a cool, lean style, cruised to victory in the 141 lb. weight class over Faith Franco to gain the championship.

Another great battle was Danyelle Wolf’s effort with Fallon Farrar in the 152 lb. weight class. Both fighters came out throwing hard shots from the outset, but Wolf’s superior skills and ring generalship gave her the decisive win and the championship.

Franchon Crews once again claimed victory of the middleweight title at 165 lbs. over teammate Raquel Miller. The spirited fight gave Crews the win and the chance to reign as champion.

The 178 lb. weight class saw Tiffanie Hearn win the title over Dara Shen. Hearn fought at a fast pass and pushed her way past Shen to claim the championship.

The new scoring system certainly has some kinks to work out, but as Tiara Brown noted, in training for it, the fighters have had the chance to execute truly remarkable performances.

Christina Cruz was also quoted as saying of her opponent, “She’s a strong girl, but with the new scoring system, I was able to pick my shots better. Plus, I think I kept my composure a little better in the last round than she did.”

With these women on the roster of Team USA along with the young women who fought alongside them, there is a lot to be proud of looking ahead to Rio 2016!

Congratulations to all the winners and to everyone with the heart of a lioness who took to the ring!

 

Elite Women’s Finals Results
106 lbs: Elisha Halstead, Philadelphia, Pa., dec. Alejandra Mercado, Rockford, Ill., 2-1
112 lbs: Marlen Esparza, Houston, Texas, dec. Virgina Fuchs, Kemah, Texas, 2-1
119 lbs: Christina Cruz, New York, N.Y., dec. Ayanna Vasquez, Las Cruces, N.M., 3-0
125 lbs: Jennifer Hamann, Seattle, Wash. dec. Rianna Rios, Alice, Texas, 2-1
132 lbs: Queen Underwood, Seattle, wash. dec. Tiara Brown, Ft. Meyers, Fla., 2-1
141 lbs: Bertha Aracil, Yonkers, N.Y., dec. Faith Franco, Duarte, Calif., 3-0
152 lbs: Danyelle Wolf, San Diego, Calif., dec. Fallon Farrar, Staten Island, N.Y., 3-0
165 lbs: Franchon Crews, Baltimore, Md., dec. Raquel Miller, San Francisco, Calif., 3-0
178 lbs: Tiffanie Hearn, Oxnard, Calif., dec. Dara Shen, Alexandria, Va., 3-0

05
Apr
13

2013 USA Boxing Nationals finals set for 4/6/2013!

2013 USA Boxing Nationals finals set for 4/6/2013!

Mikaela Mayer after winning her Quarterfinal Bout. Credit: Mikaela Mayer

Yet another USA Boxing Nationals is coming to an end on Saturday with two Olympians vying for titles along side newcomers and seasoned veterans.

2013 USA Boxing Nationals

The event has not been without controversy given the introduction of a new scoring system and the change in the age categories which meant that Olympic gold medal winner, Claressa Shields competed in the Youth Women division.

The Nationals is also the first major amateur competition allowing Elite Men to fight without helmets in years. This continues to raise serious concerns as the athletes may well face increased risks for head trauma and cuts — along with probing questions as to the motives for the change. Elite Women were excluded from this change — to the consternation of some — although in this case, exclusion might actually have been a good thing … for a change.

The Semi-final bout between Tiara Brown and Mikaela Mayer has also been controversal. Brown was given the nod with a 2-1 decision, but there are those who feel that Mayer was “robbed.” One question to ask is whether the scoring is such that Mayer’s team is basing their complaint on what might have been a different outdome in the old system.

Have a look at the video and you be the judge.

The Finals action begins at 1:00 PM on 4/6/2012.

For informationclick here for the USA Boxing Website

You can also watch all the action live HERE

ELITE WOMEN FINALS 

106 lbs: Elisha Halstead v. Alejandra Mercado

112 lbs: Marlen Esparza v. Virginia Fuchs

119 lbs:  Christina Cruz v. Ayanna Vasquez

125 lbs: Rianna Rios v. Jen Hamann

132 lbs: Queen Underwood v. Tiara Brown

141 lbs: Faith Franco v. Bertha Aracil

152 lbs: Danyelle Wolf v. Fallon Farrar

165 lbs: Franchon Crews v. Raquel Miller

178 lbs: Tiffanie Hearn v. Dara Shen

05
Apr
13

USA Boxing Nationals! April 4, 2013 Women’s Boxing Results

USA Boxing Nationals! April 4, 2013 Women’s Boxing Results

Raquel Miller throws a straigh right in the USA Boxing Semifinals. Credit: Norcalboxing.net

Another exciting day of bouts brought some veterans of last year’s Olympic trials in Spokane, WA forward and one defeat. As it stands, Olympian Queen Underwood will be facing Tiara Brown in the Finals on Saturday. Underwood managed a decisive 3-0 win over Melissa Parker, while Brown, won by decision over teammate and fellow Olympic Trials veteran Mikaela Mayer, 2-1. Other big wins in the morning session included Christina Cruz who defeated Amanda Pavone, 3-0 by decision. Cruz, who is also making a bid for her seventh history making NY Daily News Golden Gloves title moves on to the final against Ayanna Vasquez.

Olympian Marlen Esparza with her hand raised after her second round stoppage. Credit:  Julie GoldstickerOlympian Marlen Esparza handily won her semi-final bout by TKO at 1:59 of the second round over Maureeca Lambert. She will face Virginia Fuchs in the finals who won her bout 3-0. Also advancing as expected were Bertha Aracil defeating Aleah Dillard, 2-1, Raquel Miller over Alicia Napoleon, 3-0 and crowd favorite Franchon Crews who will face Miller after getting the nod by a walk-over.

Jen Hamann making her first bid at Nationals also came out a winner by defeating Monayah Patterson, 3-0. Hamann will face Rianna Rios who defeated her opponent, Karla Herrera 2-1.

For information on upcoming bouts click here for the USA Boxing Website

You can also watch all the action live HERE! Final bouts on April 6, 2013!

11 a.m. Session

Elite Women’s Division
119 lbs: Christina Cruz, New York, N.Y., dec. Amanda Pavone, Burlington, Maine, 3-0
119 lbs: Ayanna Vasquez, Las Cruces, N.M., dec. Carissa Morton, San Francisco, Calif., 3-0
152 lbs: Danyelle Wolf, San Diego, Calif., dec. Nisa Rodriguez, Bronx, N.Y., 2-1
152 lbs: Fallon Farrar, Staten Island, N.Y., won on a TB over Amournix Stamps, Milwaukee, Wisc., TB
106 lbs: Elisah Halstead, Philadelphia, Pa., dec. Lisa Ha, Honolulu, Hawaii, 2-1
106 lbs: Alejandra Mercado, Rockford, Ill., dec. Melissa Kaye, New York, N.Y., 3-0
132 lbs: Queen Underwood, Seattle, Wash., dec. Melissa Parker, Spring, Texas, 3-0
132 lbs: Tiara Brown, Hyattsville, Md., dec. Mikaela Mayer, Los Angeles, Calif., 2-1

Youth Women’s Division
106 lbs: Marisol Lopez, Stratford, Calif., dec. Monica Van Pelt, Toledo, Ohio, 2-1
106 lbs: Monica Suazo, Tucson, Ariz., dec. Yajaira Ramirez, McKinney, Texas, 2-1

5 p.m. Session

Elite Women’s Division
112 lbs: Virgina Fuchs, Kemah, Texas, dec. Ayesha Green, Trenton, N.J., 3-0
112 lbs: Marlen Esparza, Houston, Texas, won on TKO over Maureeca Lambert, Glen Ellyn, Ill., TKO-2(1:59)
125 lbs: Rianna Rios, Alice, Texas, dec. Karla Herrera, Los Angeles, Calif., 2-1
125 lbs: Jennifer Hamann, Seattle, Wash., dec. Monayah Patterson, Warren, Mich., 3-0
141 lbs: Faith Franco, Duarte, Calif., won on a TKO over Griselda Madrigal Santana, East Wenatchee, Wash., TKO-3(0:47)
141 lbs: Bertha Aracil, Yonkers, N.Y., dec. Aleah Dillard, Dallas, Texas, 2-1
165 lbs: Franchon Crews, Baltimore, Md., won on a walkover over Jasmine Acevedo, Beeville, Texas, W/O
165 lbs: Raquel Miller, San Francisco, Calif., dec. Alicia Napoleon, Lindenhurst, N.Y., 3-0

03
Apr
13

USA Boxing Nationals! April 2, 2013 and April 3, 2013 Results

USA Boxing Nationals! Women’s Boxing Results April 2, 2013 & April 3, 2013 – FULL RESULTS (UPDATED)

Tiara Brown, Coach Roque & Claressa Shields, Spokane, Wa., Credit: USA Boxing

The USA Boxing Nationals are underway in Spokane, Washington! The bouts are under the new rules originally promulgated by the AIBA and include many changes.  Foremost is the change in the designation of Youth, Senior and Elite boxing men and women.

For one, Youth male and female fighters are now 16-18 years of age. This has meant that gold medal Olympian Claressa Shields was unable to compete in the Elite Women division.  The Elite Men’s and Women’s divisions are also changed with the age spread from 19-40. Most significantly, Elite Men compete without headgear, a decision many feel was made in part to attract more viewers to the competitions after the lackluster support at the Olympics.

The justification is increasing evidence that boxing headgear does not add to the safety of boxers from head trauma in any significant way.  Questions being raised, however, ask what the impact will be on the potential for cuts … and … why, why, why, are Elite Women’s Division fighters still required to wear headgear. Hmmm…

Another big change is the change in the scoring to the ten-point must system.

Time will tell how all of this shakes out … meanwhile, the Elite Women’s Division fights are underway.

Queen Underwood defeated Maritza Guillen, by decision 3-0, 4/3/2013,  USA Boxing National Championships

Big winners so far have included Olympian, Queen Underwood in the 132 lb. weight class who defeated Maritza Guillen 3-0 under the new scoring system. Also fighting at 132 lbs, Tiara Brown won her bout by decision over Kristin Carlson, 3-0, and Mikaela Mayer won by decision over LaKesha Springle, 3-0.

For information on upcoming bouts click here for the USA Boxing Website

You can also watch all the action live HERE!  Next fights at 5:00 PM PST 4/3/2013!

Results for April 2, 2013 & April 3, 2013:

ELITE WOMEN: APRIL 2, 2013, 5:00 PM SESSION

125 lbs: Haley Pasion, Aiea, Hawaii, dec. Taversha Norwood, Oxnard, Calif., 2-1
125 lbs: Jasmedh Rosales, Los Angeles, Calif., dec. Alyssa Rivera, Lamont, Ill., 3-0

ELITE WOMEN: APRIL 3, 2013, 11:00 AM SESSION

106 lbs: Elisha Halstead, Philadelphia, Pa., dec. Leah Mitchem, Savannah, Ga., 3-0
119 lbs: Amanda Pavone, Burlington, Mass., dec. Monica Alvarez, San Antonio, Texas, 3-0
119 lbs: Carissa Morton, San Francisco, Calif., dec. Rory Santos, Anchorage, Alaska, 3-0
132 lbs: Queen Underwood, Seattle, Wash., dec. Maritza Guillen, Reno, Nev., 3-0
132 lbs: Melissa Parker, Spring, Texas, dec. Lisa Porter, Valley Village, Calif., 3-0
132 lbs: Tiara Brown, Hyattsville, Md., dec. Kristin Carlson, Chicago, 3-0
132 lbs: Mikaela Mayer, Los Angeles, Calif., dec. LaKesha Springle, Martinez, Ga., 3-0

ELITE WOMEN: APRIL 3, 2013, 5:oo PM SESSION

125 lbs: Karla Herrera, Los Angeles, Calif. dec. Haley Pasion, Aiea, Hawaii, 3-0
125 lbs: Rianna Rios, Alice, Texas, dec. Michelle Cook, Massena, N.Y., 3-0
125 lbs: Monayah Patterson, Warren, Mich., dec. Amorena Baca, Denver, Colo., 3-0
125 lbs: Jennifer Hamann, Seattle, Wash., dec. Jasmedh Rosales, Los Angeles, Calif., 3-0
152 lbs: Nisa Rodriguez, Bronx, N.Y., dec. Jenah Smith, Seattle, Wash., 3-0
14
Mar
13

Women’s Boxing: Jen Hamann’s “road to gold”

Women’s Boxing: Jen Hamann’s “Road to Gold” 

Jen Hamann, Photo Credit: Jen Hamann

The 2012 London Olympic Games which featured the introduction of women’s boxing has come and gone. The distinctive honor of having participated as one of the first thirty-six women to compete is also certainly singular. But that has not diminished the hopes and dreams of a new generation of female boxers who have already begun to train for the 2016 Games in Brazil.

One such fighter is 27-year-old Jen Hamann. Based out of Seattle, Jen is a two-time Golden Gloves winner who emerged this year as the 2013 Outstanding Female Boxer at the Jr. Golden Gloves.

Jen HamannJen has amassed an 18-2 record since taking up the gloves in 2009. She is currently counting down to this year’s 2013 USA Boxing National Championships beginning on April 1st, challenging for a spot on the podium at 125 lbs. Jen trains under head coach Tricia Turton, herself a former professional boxer, who recently began Arcaro Boxing. Together, they are forging a partnership to help prepare Jen for the competitive challenges that lie ahead.

Jen Hamann & Tricia Turton

Though no stranger to high-stakes competition as a Division-1 athlete in soccer, track & field and cross-country for Seattle University, Jen relies on Turton to help keep her focused and on point. Hamann also works through her experiences by maintaining a blog that recounts her feelings about the sport that has become so much a part of who she is. The link is here: Hamann Road to Boxing Gold. 

Recently, Girlboxing had the opportunity to enter a dialogue with Jen Hamann about her Olympic dreams. Here’s what she had to say:

1. Boxing is not for the faint of heart, what is it about boxing that has driven you to want to spend the next three and a half years of your life dedicated to gaining a berth on the USA’s women’s boxing team fighting at the Brazil 2016 Olympics?

Boxing has given me an outlet to express myself. There’s something satisfying about letting it all go on a heavy bag.  I also have a bit of a sassy temper, and when I suppress this short fuse, it eventually comes out on others in some other way. Boxing doesn’t change my personality – I’m still sassy as ever, it just lets me express it everyday.  Sports and exercise do this for many people, but boxing does it for me. As for the 2016 Olympics, that’s easy – I can never do anything half-heartedly. Whether a good thing or a bad thing, I have to consume my life what I am passionate about – the Olympics are the principle of amateur boxing. Who wouldn’t want to put on a USA uniform and represent their country? 

Jen Hamann, Photo Credit: Alan Berner, The Seattle Times2. You’ve written that you “see boxing as a tool for self-expression, passion, and awareness.” As you embark on your goal of winning a place on the Brazil 2016 team, how will those three attributes take you through the next four years?

Sometimes I get frustrated for being frustrated at practice. I can be a perfectionist in training, and this narrows my view of possibilities. When I fight my personal style of boxing by fixing bad habits, I loose my passion and I end up working to correct something rather than express something, trust my hands and let them go. The 2016 Olympics is a long road and right now, this is a distance race. The more you can be yourself the longer you will last. Being amateur is hard enough; the more awareness you can have of your self, what you love and how you express yourself, the better boxer you will become.

3. You also see boxing as playing an important role in your personal development. How is that expressed as you go through the day-to-day work of being an amateur fighter?

Being an amateur fighter is hard – especially now. I’m not currently on the radar and no one really knows me, I’m pretty new to the National scene. Since training for the Olympics is a full-time job you can imagine how hard it is right now. I have to walk into fundraisers and local events saying that “I am training for the 2016 Olympics” without much of a resume to back it up. It’s like claiming the title before earning the position. But the more I can say it, the more confidence I have in the ring. Since I’ve started writing about it, my boxing has improved.

Jen Hamann, Photo Credit: Alan Berner, The Seattle Times

4. As an accomplished athlete since high school and as a Division-1 college athlete in Track & Field, Cross Country and Soccer, you are no stranger to high-stakes competition. How have you incorporated those experiences into the training and mental focus you need for the ring?

Soccer was my first love. But the difference between the athlete I was in college and the athlete I am now is my confidence. I was a great practice player, for some reason, I couldn’t translate it into the games – I was so afraid of messing up that it messed me up! In boxing, I went into it as an underdog looking for a new hobby without any pressure of college ball. Clearly things have changed! The difference now is that I’m not afraid to show confidence and passion in the ring like I was in soccer. In boxing I have no problem in front of a crowd and I have fun with it – the performance is no longer a burden but a blessing and I’m lucky to participate everyday.

Jen Hamann5. You maintain an active blog recounting your experiences in and out of the ring, as well as your philosophical inquiries as you train. You recently wrote, “Just like in a boxing fight – we continue to put ourselves in a situation of fear and panic in the ring because we want to simultaneously feel the power of recreating the meaning and intention behind each punch.” What is the practical application of that idea as you train in the ring?

If I can push myself in the ring, push through fear, reactions, and comfort boundaries, then I can do this is real life. Creating these sort of fake situations in the ring makes you more likely to put yourself out there in life – you take on situations that you normally wouldn’t. Taking this perspective, I’ve personally grown a lot – I’m more expressive, more confident, more open to talking about what I want, what I need, what my opinions are, taking risks, and taking stances. The only way to go somewhere new both in boxing and in your life is to experience discomfort.  It’s uncomfortable sometimes to take risks – announcing myself as an 2016 Olympic hopeful, or applying to grad school this year, but without the risk and the fear, the success is far less exciting.

6. You’ve mapped out competitive goals that include winning a USA Boxing National Championship, the National Golden Gloves Championship and the National PAL Championship. While you fight at 125 pounds, it can still be difficult to find competitive amateur fights. How have you and your trainer mapped out your competitive options so that you can continue to compete at the highest echelons of the sport?

Finding good fights can be challenging. Luckily, I have a coach who will fly to the end of the world and back with me to find a fight. As a former professional boxer and a former member of the USA women’s rugby team, coach Tricia knows what it feels like to put on that USA jersey and represent your country. Now retired from competition, she wants to give me that same feeling at the 2016 Olympics. As far as finding fights now, this is why we are doing our best to make it to all the national events around the U.S. – experience is almost everything for a boxer.

Jen Hamann "Skittles"

7. You’ve been fighting out of Cappy’s Gym since you started in the sport, but are following your trainer Tricia Turton to Arcaro Boxing. How is that transition going and what do you both see as your goals as you begin this new chapter in your career as a fighter?

Timely question – I just wrote something about this transition on my blog here: The Adventures of Moose and Kid Skittles. Tricia has always been the brains behind the boxing skills, the mentoring and the person passionate about boxing in her community, so it would be crazy of me not to follow her.  The transition is only difficult because she still doesn’t have four walls where she can hang a heavy bag. Luckily, my community has been amazing at helping us out with places to train and funding trips for fights. If we can get through this, we can get through anything in the future. 

Jen Hamann8.  You have chosen to fight among an elite group of women boxers who are all striving for a place in the Brazil 2016 Olympics.  How would you describe your relationships and what you have to offer each other as you embark on your journey together?

Currently, I am not on the USA team so I don’t know any of them personally. I do know that traveling, making weight, and working towards huge athletic goals cannot be done alone. I feel that the best Olympic contenders for the US will come out of a strong, respectful and hard working National team.  We have to be willing to work together, push each other and respect each other for anyone to push their skills – our teammates can be our best trainers.

I think that there are a lot of youth female boxers who are also under the radar, being over looked. Again, we still have 3 years of training and some of my most recent fights against youth boxers entering the senior class have been hard. They are hungry, they are motivated by the 2012 Olympics, and they will not stop challenging us. Gold Medalist Claressa Shields is a perfect example of this. Which also reminds me of a recent blog piece I wrote: Does it matter how you play the game

9. In closing, what has boxing given you — and in turn what do you hope to give to the sport?

Mostly, boxing has given me a medium to express myself without feeling bad about it. It’s also given me confidence. I used to only like those famous athletes that were polite and politically correct in the media – because I used to think that expressing confidence and self-esteem was synonymous to extreme arrogance. But this is completely untrue! My favorite boxer Melissa Hernandez really expresses this well, both for herself and for other women in boxing. I think she boxes because she loves the sport, but she puts on a great show in the ring because she really does care about promoting the sport of women boxing.

I really just want others to experience what I have experienced through boxing. Though I’m not in the spotlight right now, I hope that the blog captures the ups and downs of working towards a huge goal – something that both boxers and non-boxers can relate to. The blog, sometimes a little too revealing, is right now, my way of giving back because I write pretty honestly about the whole experience. 

Be certain to check out Jen Hamann’s Blog:  Hamann Road to Boxing Gold




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