06
Feb
12

Living each day.

Living each day.

Whether it is the dangers of the ring, such as the one that has seen Ishika Lay on her long road to recovery from second-impact syndrome, or something closer to home, such as the sudden illness of a relative or friend, living each day to its fullest is an important mantra:  even when that means walking away from the things we love to do.

That means not only pursuing your dreams, but knowing when to sit out because the risks are too great.

Have a headache after sparring that won’t go away?  Go and get it checked out and follow the mantra:  when in doubt, sit it out.

I know we all tend to ignore the long-term effects of our actions or even cast a “blind eye” to their very existence, but headaches and the like are also symptoms of acute problems that can be dealt with much more readily early on.  Sometimes it is only a matter of facing down the demons that seem to haunt us when we contemplate the “why” question that prevents us from taking the next step — say to a doctor’s office.  Not to do so, however, is to play a dangerous game of roulette with one’s own health and well-being.  It is also an example of breaking a cardinal rule that can best be translated as cheating at solitaire.

Here’s another one: Do you have indigestion every time you eat a slice of pizza?  Or in the absence of that, cough after every pasta or pizza meal?  Has it seemed to escalate at night lately, even when you don’t eat pizza? Go and get that checked! And P.S. … stop eating pizza and pasta till you know what’s going on.  At the very least you might have GERD (Gastric Esophageal Reflux Disease), but it also might mean (depending on your age), that you are starting to see changes to the actual make-up of your esophagus (Barrett’s Esophagus) which can lead to “no joke” complications.

I bring this all up because so many of us “live” with things that we think are nothing that end up being a big something in a hurry when we least expect it.  When that happens the effects are often horrendous, both to the individual undergoing treatment and to family and friends who suffer along with each bump in the road.

Athletes presumably have a great sense of their bodies – certainly of the cause and effects of too little sleep, poor eating habits and so on; however, that doesn’t always translate into evaluating the relative risks of injuries or of even recognizing that the twinge in a shoulder is really a rotator cuff injury about to blow.

That’s when we all have to take some responsibility not only for our own health and well-being, but for what we see going on around us by taking to heart the “if you see something, say something” mantra.  Sure, you might be accused of putting your nose into someone’s business, but you well might recognize something that your sparring partner just doesn’t see.

Part of living each day certainly translates into living it with gusto, but we also need to be cognizant of all the aspects of our day, even the things we’d rather ignore.  The problem is the things we ignore have a way of slamming us in the face whether we acknowledge them or not, and for my money, it’s better to face an issue head on than wait for the unexpected surprise.


5 Responses to “Living each day.”


  1. February 6, 2012 at 9:08 am

    Good post. Athletes may be really in tune with our bodies, but I’ve also noticed that we have a tendency to push ourselves way too hard, even when our bodies are telling us to stop and take a break.

  2. 3 Amy
    February 8, 2012 at 12:49 pm

    We’re on the same wavelength…I wrote a similar post recently (http://betterwaitforit.blogspot.com/2012/01/for-better-or-for-worse-til-death.html).

    Speaking of how you feel after you eat, how’s your “new” diet going?

    • February 9, 2012 at 6:14 am

      LOVE you piece Amy — and note to readers … CLICK ON THE LINK!

      As for the low fat/low acid diet … hmmm. Well, I’ve lost about 25 pounds and counting and it is helping me significantly; however, I still have to ensure that I keep my meals small otherwise even when the contents are low in fat, et al. It is one of the challenges of GERD/LPR, but on the bright side, I can eat all day … and do with lots of snacks one banana or other equivalent item at a time with at least an hour or so in between!

      • 5 Amy
        February 9, 2012 at 9:55 am

        25 pounds, wow! I’m glad you have mostly figured this all out and it’s working for you. On the days when I try not to eat humongous meals and instead, like you, eat all day, it’s actually a relief–I tell myself no gorging needed if I get to eat again soon! Plus it’s great for maintaining steady blood sugars and decreasing abdominal fat. I’m happy for you.


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